"ANOMALY"

Anomaly was our 2nd robot created in the Velocity Vortex season. Throughout the lifespan of Morton, we were planning this robot as well. We begun to plan this robot in November after our PA Eastern Qualifier. After our last New Jersey meet of the season, we had a 1 month break until our next tournament. In that month we worked tirelessly to create Anomaly. Anomaly featured the same 6 wheel drive as Morton, but with a few changes. The first thing we changed was adding doubled up omni-wheels in the front of the robot to allow for better turning. We also increased the gear ratio from 1.5:1 to 2:1 so we would be even faster on the field. For our particle shooting, we switched from a dual flywheel shooter to just one flywheel. We switched to one flywheel because of the backspin created on the particles after they were launched. This allowed the particles to come back to the general area of our robot once they landed and it improved our cycle times even further. Along with the new shooter and updated drivetrain, we also added a linear slide system to cap the ball on the center vortex. We used a mix of Rev 15mm extrusion, drawer slides and Actobotics parts to create our lift. With our lift we were able to average a capping time of 12 seconds. We also had improved autonomous programs that continued to score all autonomous objectives but in a faster and more efficient way. By the World Championships in St. Louis, we were averaging 14-16 particles in each match. We consistently hit the 200+ point range with our highest scoring match being a 275 pt. match scored at a New Jersey scrimmage right before worlds. It took a lot of hard work and planning to create this robot, but in the end it was worth it and we are immensely proud of what we learned and created during Velocity Vortex.

"Morton"

Morton was the first robot we created for the Velocity Vortex season. It featured a 6 wheel drive, powered by 2 NeveRest 40 motors on both sides of the robot. The motors were geared down 1.5:1 so that the robot would be fast and efficient on the field. This robot was built mainly to score particles into the center vortex. We used a conveyor belt to feed particles into the dual flywheels to launch the particles at a rapid speed to score them. In matches we usually averaged 8-10 particles scored in the vortex. Along with particle scoring, Morton featured multiple autonomous programs that allowed it to complete every objective in the autonomous period and be flexible with our alliance partners autonomous programs as well. For end-game, we had a forklift on the back of the robot that would allow the robot to lift the cap ball up to the low height; though we rarely did that and focused more on beacons during end-game. Morton was easily hitting the 190+ point range by itself by its last tournament which was the New Jersey P'Town Throwdown meet which was on December 10th, 2017. After that meet, we decided we wanted to score even higher so we created an Anomaly.

"THROWBACK"

This robot was designed specifically for the "Flashback to the Future" off-season scrimmage that was on May 22nd, 2016.  We decided to call it "Throwback" because we had a throwback to Block Party and based it off of some of the old Block Party bots.  The reason we modeled it after old Block Party robots was because that since this was an off-season scrimmage they were using a modified RES-Q field but with elements from every past game (hence the name "Flashback to the Future"). When we read the rules for the modified game, we saw that scoring cubes into the Block Party pendulums was the most efficient and effective way to score points. Because of that we decided that it would be a fun off-season project would be to create a whole new robot for this scrimmage that was based on Block-Party designs.


"DREAM"

  Dream is the first actual FTC bot we've ever built. We named it Dream because we were rookies at the time and we felt we didn't fully know what we were doing so we joked that it would run off of our "dream" that it would work. When we were first designing Dream, we had a completely different idea of what it would be compared to what it is now. Originally we were going to climb up to the high zone and drop debris but our design didn't work out too well and we ended up in last at our first two tournaments. After those first two tournaments we pivoted our design to hang using tape measures. With the tape measure design we were able to get winning alliance captain twice and qualified for states. At states we made it to the semi-finals but didn't advance to the East Super Regionals. Dream was a good start for our rookie year and we learned a lot when designing and building it which will allow us to make even better robots for the upcoming seasons.

Dream is the first actual FTC bot we've ever built. We named it Dream because we were rookies at the time and we felt we didn't fully know what we were doing so we joked that it would run off of our "dream" that it would work. When we were first designing Dream, we had a completely different idea of what it would be compared to what it is now. Originally we were going to climb up to the high zone and drop debris but our design didn't work out too well and we ended up in last at our first two tournaments. After those first two tournaments we pivoted our design to hang using tape measures. With the tape measure design we were able to get winning alliance captain twice and qualified for states. At states we made it to the semi-finals but didn't advance to the East Super Regionals. Dream was a good start for our rookie year and we learned a lot when designing and building it which will allow us to make even better robots for the upcoming seasons.